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2003.05.14 10:17
Know your Exit
I knew virtually nothing about Joseph Cornell until I read Joseph Cornell/Marcel Duchamp...in resonance in Spring 2001. (I was/am very familiar with Duchamp, however, because of years of many visits to the Philadelphia Museum of Art.) I found that Cornell and I had/have virtually identical kitchen sinks, and that Cornell's 'studio' looks very much like my basement. It wouldn't surprise me at all if Flushing vis-à-vis New York City is very similar to Olney vis-à-vis Philadelphia.


2003.05.21
"Rubbing My Duchampiana Oeuvre"
...compile and organize all my Duchamp related artwork and data. Begin printing “cracks” on various magazine pages, and also generate some collages utilizing the Duchamp (in print/magazines) material. ...compose a CD entitled Rubbing My Duchampiana Oeuvre.


2003.06.05 14:56
Re: David Rimanelli
David, I'm overstepping, but you might want to consider viewing musstudies7.shtml in person for a possible entry. I saw it yesterday, and it's pretty cool in its context. Really liked (finally) seeing the 1956-57 Sweeny/Duchamp broadcast too.
Cocktails in Philadelphia are an option, even.


2003.06.05 14:56
Re: Anthony Vidler on Gordon Matta-Clark
I really don't know enough about Matta-Clark to answer your question. Vidler provides a very good 'genealogy' of Matta-Clark's architectural background, an perhaps what Matta-Clark found and exposed is a large part of architecture's and architecture education's vulnerable, pink and soft underbelly. [Trust me, that underbelly is still there, and even pinker and fatter these days.]
Beyond that, I'm honestly jealous of Matta-Clark being Duchamp's godson! Some people have all the luck. Then again, I did tear out a quondam termite infested baseboard in my mother's basement on Tuesday.


2003.06.06 13:45
homage to Matta-Clark's father and godfather
Just before encountering The Bell and the Glass at the Philadelphia Museum of Art this past Wednesday, I was walking down the stairs directly adjacent gallery 182 where The Bell and the Glass is installed. On the landing half way down these stairs is the entrance to the 20th century art curatorial offices, and on the wall next to the office door presently hangs Roberto Matta Echaurren's The Bachelors Twenty Years After. This painting is a fairly new acquisition of the PMA, and when I first saw it back in February it was hanging within the main contemporary art galleries (where a rather famous early Pollack currently hangs).
I didn't think of it on Wednesday, but last night it dawned on me that on Wednesday morning I submitted a post at Atrforum/talkback Re: Matta-Clark (son of Roberto Matta Echaurren and godson of Marcel Duchamp) which was not initially accepted, then I went to the Phladelphia Museum of Art (because I was extremely bored at home) where I unexpectedly encountered The Bachelors Twenty Years After, and then unexpectedly encountered The Bell and the Glass.
As I already mentioned, I don't know much about Gordon Matta-Clark, but for some reason I became unexpected/unknowingly close (albeit with degrees of separation) to him on Wednesday.

2003.06.06 13:54
Re: Weapons of Mass Tamp...
...you forgot to mention how Duchamp very often reenacted his own oeuvre during the latter part of his career! You know, all those readymade reenactments--you own (a pretend?) one yourself, don't you?


2003.07.05 12:04
Re: logic chess
Re: Neo Futurist Prime Time Show about Duchamp
Posted by Stephen Lauf on November 05, 2002 at 08:54:26:
In Reply to: Neo Futurist Prime Time Show about Duchamp posted by John Pierson on November 04, 2002 at 01:11:46:
The notion of casting Duchamp in the nude might be all that is needed to ensure success, with occasional slips into drag, of course. And that line, "Oddly enough, the crack of my ass is a ready-made" gets the audience howling every time. ["Don't tell me. I noticed it too. Something sphinx in here again."]
Then is there the competing notion of an enormous Duchamp dream of a chess game with the opponent unknown, yet all the pieces are actual personalities. For example, Duchamp's Queen is Michelangelo and Duchamp's King is Rrose Selavy, while the opponent's Queen is Elizabeth II and the opponent's King is Michelangelo. [One has to wonder if playing with a real Queen has its advantages.] As usual, one of Duchamp's Bishops is Pope St. Celestine V, the one that "was unfitted for the papal office in every respect except his holiness." And, with any luck, the peon's are dedicated people like you and me.


2003.07.11 17:25
Re: article
Coincidentally, I was at Paley yesterday and copied the article. I haven't been to Paley in over a month, and I remembered there was some article of interest (that I found reference to online recently) in a journal called Art Matters or something like that. I didn't remember what the article was, but when I went to the journal section at Paley, I looked up journals that began in ART, and, sure enough, a portion of the Campo Marzio was on the cover of The Art Bulletin.
I read the Campo Marzio portion of the article so far, and I can't help but think that the author had read Encyclopedia Ichnographica when it was published at Quondam 1998.
Thanks for the reference though--I saw that Joseph Cornell / Marcel Duchamp...in resonance was on the returned book shelf, and thus you were at Paley recently. We seem to be in step with each other's spirits.
I'm working on compiling compact disk publications (for sale) these days. I completed Etant Donnes' Back Door 1 July 2003, and now I'm working on Pretensions of an Unarchitect 001, a multi-volume publication regarding all my pretensions (self-evidently something I'm very good at) and my unarchitectness (also something I'm very good at). The first copy of Etant Donnes Back Door was just sold at eBay within the last hour.
Hope all is going well with you too. Do you want to get together for some photographing sometime soon (when it might not be too hot), eg, views from Center City parking lots and/or Northern Liberties (on bike maybe?) looking for inspiration of Kahn?

2003.08.17 23:37
to see in Philly
Kahn's project for the Philadelphia College of Art was never executed, and the Mill Creek Housing project was demolished last year. There is the quondam Ahavath Israel Synagogue, Kahn's first indepedent building (1935), a couple blocks west of North Broad Street--the facade was redone something 2000, however. Erdman Hall, the dormitories at Bryn Mawr College, were just renovated 2002. Richard's Medical Towers still at UofP and still looking good. There's lots more obscure early Kahn in the Philadelphia area, kinda like going on a treasure hunt.
By far, there is more Venturi et al architecture in and around Philadelphia than anyplace else on the planet. Ditto for the architecture of Mitchell/Giurgola.
The Venturi, Scott Brown & Assoc. Philadelphia Orchestra Hall was never executed. Vinoly did the 'replacement' Kimmel Center though.
The Philadelphia Museum of Art Duchamp Collection is indeed the largest in the world. Try finding Etant Donnes' Back Door while you're there.
Kahn proposed marriage to Esther Israeli at the Rodin Museum. Don't miss the Gates of Hell as you go in!
Legend has it that Benjamin Franklin famously flew his kite just east of what is now Ridge Ave. and Buttonwood St. Pretty derelict place right now, but there is a electrical substation just down the street.


2003.10.23 14:47
Stan Allen tonight
My goal is in fact to bring on harrassment and a terrible reputation, as well as to be the greatest blow hard, pompous ass of archinect. I did not expect such success while utilizing less than one percent of my potential, however.
This is fun. I truly enjoy it.
Here, bite on this:
The notion of casting Duchamp in the nude might be all that is needed to ensure success, with occasional slips into drag, of course. And that line, "Oddly enough, the crack of my ass is a ready-made" gets the audience howling every time. ["Don't tell me. I noticed it too. Something sphinx in here again."]
Then is there the competing notion of an enormous Duchamp dream of a chess game with the opponent unknown, yet all the pieces are actual personalities. For example, Duchamp's Queen is Michelangelo and Duchamp's King is Rrose Selavy, while the opponent's Queen is Elizabeth II and the opponent's King is Michelangelo. [One has to wonder if playing with a real Queen has its advantages.] As usual, one of Duchamp's Bishops is Pope St. Celestine V, the one that "was unfitted for the papal office in every respect except his holiness." And, with any luck, the peon's are dedicated people like you and me.
mp/euclitian/phillygash.jpg
Or should I say chew this up.
1.05% so far.
reenactment forthcoming?
probably
Even novocain doesn't work?

2003.10.30 14:28
Re: feminist art
Let's be clear in that Capricorn is not the first to "raise" the issue of gay art (here at talkback), nor is he the first to address the "art of gayness". Warhol, a very influential artist of the past 50 years was always (whether recognized or hyped as such during his life) an artist of gayness (something very related to 'camp' if not many times camp itself). Duchamp, maybe he's very influential bachelor art; Cornell, maybe he's very influential closet case art. The art of gayness appeal? Maybe.
I remember cracking up a whole segment of the bar after watching a somewhat uncharacteristic k.d. lang video. "I don't know if I like (her doing) that," they said. "You just don't get it. It's dyke camp."


2003.11.09 11:57
Re: the difference between shit and extasis
Pat write: the others are frequently becoming "idiots" because they can't perceive their "art" is actually perceived as bull sh....... by a majority. even so then they keep on, eventually sustained by their idea of being misunderstood, or trying to impose some ideas to others those others wouldn't never accept. or they consider the law of majority rule as a sh... for being strongly motivated individualists but sometimes they can't understand such misunderstanding, and keep pushing on without any result, neither for them.
Steve asks: If what you write is indeed true (as opposed to hypothetical), then there are no doubt plentiful examples to offer. Can you at least supply us with a few?
Pat also writes: sometimes their public is more absurd, and can't see the talented work the others should see as a new process of expression.
Steve adds: Good examples of this are van Gogh and Duchamp (and there are still some that don't see all that much regarding Duchamp's art, and, who knows, they may still be right).


2004.01.27 16:58
Re:group
And now Otto's thrilled to hear that both Duchamp and Jennewein will attend the Horace Trumbauer Architecture Fan Club Convention to deliver their jointy-authored paper, and Gordon's to present a moldy paper on mildew too.


2004.01.30 13:35
Re: Contemporary Art as sex
The title of Duchamp's and Jennewein's co-authored paper for the Horace Trumbauer Architecture Fan Club Convention is "Nudist Camp at the Philadelphia Museum of Art."


2004.01.30 14:19
Tante Acht und Achtzig and "Nudist Camp..."
"His [i.e., Ludwig's and Otto's father] other sister, Princess Alexandra, suffered throughout her life from the believe that she had once swallowed an entire grand piano made of glass. She spent many years locked away in a convent." After dying at Nymphenburg she later opted for reincarnation, and even played her later self in a movie.
The title of Duchamp's and Jennewein's paper for the HTAFCC is "Nudist Camp at the Philadelphia Museum of Art".

2004.03.18 12:51
Re: architecture and nature...
nature of fertility?
nature of assimilation?
metabolic nature?
nature of osmosis?
electro-magnetic nature?
the nature of all frequency?
or merely
the academically stunted nature of imitation? (doctored mimesis)
de-coda:
[visceral reenactment
or merely
reenacting a who or a what]
inlusio:
there's romance and there's Rome ants
[Louis I. Kahn arrived late last night. He spent most of the 30th anniversary of his death yesterday in Ireland, with St. Patrick actually. He and Catherine are already busy composing their paper, but he hasn't quessed Franciska's quest yet. Maria, Melania (the younger), and Piranesi are designing a game for all to play--delineate an aftermathic reenactment of the first Visigothic plunder of the Horti Salustiani. Otto's posted Duchamp's and Jennewein's "Nudist Camp" survey so far -- wqc/02/0154.htm
Theodosius was Spanish.
Honorius worried about his Spanish relatives under Constantine the usurper (and with good reason because they were killed before he knew it).
Their Spanish heritage (along with their same age, disposition, and wealth) was a bond between Maria and the younger Melania--a bond to the very last day (whenever that is).
"The train is Spain stays mainly....."]


2004.03.31 10:29
Re: Diane Arbus at LACMA
Duchamp and Jennewein have asked Arbus to help them compose "Nudist Camp at the Philadelphia Museum of Art" for the upcoming Horace Trumbauer Architecture Fan Club Convention. Arbus hasn't answered their request yet, however.


2004.04.01 11:47
Re: “crossology”
I thought well of your contributions to 'crossology' (as you now put it) last night. I thought how you're very much adding 'modern' data to the record. I also like Pat's annexations. Crossology is a vast territory, and it's somewhat amazing what and how certain paths cross here at design-l.
1 April 1999 is when I first learned of St. Helena as the mother of Constantine and of her activity as builder of highly significant/original Christian basilicas. Five years ago it was Holy Thursday, and ten years ago 1 April was Good Friday, when (a close friend) R. David Schmitt died right in the middle of the afternoon.
"Calendrical Coincidence"
Interesting how this stuff happened in Philadelphia, where Broad St. and Market St. manifest the largest cardo and decumanus in the world--a planned and then 'concrete' crossing of two main urban street.
Initially, it was data, actually the absence of data within Piranesi's Ichnographia Campi Martii that led me to look for the 'architect' of Rome's Constantinian Basilicas, buildings which should be present within the Ichnographia, but are not--Rome's Pagan edifices are present, but not the (contemporaneous) Christian ones.
Much of my focus over the last five years has concentrated on the time between 28 October 312 (when Constantine 'converted' from leading his troops into battle under a Pagan guise/symbol to leading his troops into battle under a Christian guise/symbol) to sometime late 328/early 329 (when (I believe) Eutropia died). This period in time is when Christian church building was, as we say now, 'booming' throughout the Roman Empire for the first time, and it was Helena and Eutropia that were mostly responsible for all this (architectural) activity. From the very start, it thrills me that women, and not men, played this important historical role--and not just any women, but 'twin basilissas'.
Not too long ago, countable days actually, I first learned of Melania the Younger, and how her (enormously expensive) family estate just outside the walls of Rome at the Salarian Gate, was one of the great properties (along with the Gardens of Sallust) that were plundered when Alaric and his Visigoths broke into (at the Salarian Gate) and sacked Rome for the first time. The Visigoths initially camped for many months outside the walls of Rome (near the Salarian Gate) thereby starving the city by disrupting all deliveries of grain from Africa to the city. The Salarian Gate, the Gardens of Sallust, and the Gardens Valeriani (Melania's inheritance) are all delineated within Piranesi's Ichnographia Campi Martii right where they are supposed to be. Interesting, right next to this complex of buildings/structures, Piranesi also delineates a Porticus Neronianae, a completely fictitious building in the shape of a large cross within a circle (a composition, coincidentally, that follows the circle/square juncture pattern similar to the Timepiece gauge of the theory of chronosomatics). Within a day of assimilating all this new (to me) data, I came to see how the inner circle of the Porticus Neronianiae matches circle of the compass/north arrow that Piranesi also delineated within the Ichnographia, and I came to see how if you rotate the cross of the Porticus Neronianae 45 degrees, its four points then correspond exactly to the four cardinal points of global direction. (Just like you wrote today, Brian, I realized that) the Porticus Neronianae of Piranesi's Ichnographia Campi Martii is the X that marks the spot where the first attacking Visigoths camped. [There are even more 'symbols' to interpret here, like 'shifting winds' and Nero as anti-Christ precursor, but more on that latter.]
I'm still thrilled, mostly because the thrill is still capable of being there.
Today, I'm probably going to make a quick visit to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, specifically to look again at the Life of Constantine tapestries designed by Rubens in the Great Hall (here I can see figural representations of Helena and Eutropia, among many others), then the campy nude portrait of Cosimo de Medici, then the period room from Southern Bavaria that Napoleon once slept in, then Promentheus Bound, then the gifts of Eva Stotesbury in memory of her husband Ned, then the portrait of Franklin looking at his electrical via lightening bell ringing invention, then the Duchamp Gallery, and finally (outside) Jennewien's polychrome mythology filling one of the museum pediments.
yours truly,
a Horace Trumbauer architecture fan
ps I spent most of yesterday preparing two letters with pictures that my mother is sending to Johannes von Ow and Monika von Ow. One of the last things my mother physically did with these people was huddling in a baron's basement while Munich was being bombed in Spring 1944.

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