1 April

1488 Michelangelo apprenticed to the painters Domenico and David Ghirlandaio

Exhibit One   0016   1001b   c   d
1983.04.01

Kind of Collage of 2 = odd
1984.04.01

1999 'discovery' of St. Helena; Holy Thursday

house/museum [click]
2001.04.01     2512 2513 2514 2515

Re: Has anyone seen Rosalind Krauss?
2003.04.01 09:05

been there, done that [taboo]
2003.04.01 18:37

Origin of Ignudi
2004.04.01 17:11

1 April
2013.04.01 21:41     6603v



2003.04.01 09:05
Re: Has anyone seen Rosalind Krauss?
Krauss was in Paris 24 June 1999, standing between Peter Eisenman and Hubert Damisch. She is short, but didn't look all that old. Had big dark sunglasses on her head.


2003.04.01 18:37
been there, done that [taboo]
Guess it's time for me to work on the Piranesi print now. And to think I was going start that two weeks ago. Guess I needed some more inspiration.

2004.04.01 17:11
Origin of Ignudi
In the lower right corner of The Marriage of Constantine and Fausta tapestry designed by Rubens (1623-25) at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, there is a semi-nude 'slave' holding back an entering bull by the horns. This figure is clearly a 'reenactment' of Michelangelo's ignudi figures found within the Sistine Chapel ceiling fresco (1508-12). Around the corner from where this tapestry hangs, hangs the nude portrait of Cosimo I de' Medici as Orpheus (1537-40). The label of this painting explains how the pose of Cosimo here is inspired by [and reenactment of] the Torso Belevedere. The pose of the slave within The Mariage of Constantine and Fausta and the pose of Cosimo as Orpheus are virtually identical.
from a web search of torso belvedere:
The Belvedere Torso was named after the Cortile del Belvedere in the Vatican where the sculpture was first installed by Pope Clement VII (1523-1534 A.D.) and was one of the few ancient statues discovered during the Renaissance. The artist Michelangelo reputedly referred to the torso as his "teacher."
from another web search of torso belevedere:
The Torso Belvedere, the famous torso of Hercules, in the Vatican, was discovered in the fifteenth century. It is said that Michael Angelo greatly admired it.



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Stephen Lauf © 2017.05.20